Existing Patients

Please use the information below to refer to the post op instructions for our procedures

DO NOT DISTURB THE AREA:  For the next few days, and especially the first 24 hours, it is very important to allow your body to form a good clot and start the natural healing process. Swishing, sucking through a straw, and smoking can all dislodge the clot. Keep anything from entering the wound (crunchy food, toothpicks, eating utensils). Be sure to chew on the opposite side for 24 hours.

 

BLEEDING:  When you leave the office, you might be biting on a gauze pad to control bleeding. Keep slight pressure on this gauze for at least 1 hour. Don’t change it during this time; it needs to remain undisturbed while a clot forms in the extraction socket. After 1 hour you may remove it. You may bite on another gauze for 30 minutes if you feel it is still bleeding.  Small amounts of blood in the saliva can make your saliva appear quite red. This is normal and may be noticed the rest of the day after the procedure.

 

PAIN:  Some discomfort is normal after surgery. To minimize pain, Take  Tylenol, Advil, or similar non-aspirin pain reliever every 3 to 4 hours  to maintain comfort. Take it before the anesthesia wears off. If prescription pain medication is prescribed, take it as instructed on the label.

 

 SMOKING:  Smoking should be stopped following surgery. Healing and success of the surgery will be substantially reduced by the cigarette smoke chemicals in your body. Also the suction created when inhaling cigarettes can dislodge the clot. Smokers are at greater risk of developing a painful Dry Socket.

 

BRUSHING:  Do not brush your teeth for the first 8 hours after surgery. After this, you may brush your teeth gently, but avoid the area of surgery for 3 days.

 

RINSING:  Avoid all rinsing or swishing for 24 hours after extraction. Rinsing can disturb the formation of a healing blood clot which is essential to proper healing. This could cause bleeding and risk of dry socket. After 24 hours you may begin gentle rinsing with  saltwater. Avoid commercial mouth rinses.

 

ANTIBIOTICS:  If you were given an antibiotic prescription, take all of them as directed until they are gone. Women: some antibiotics can reduce the effectiveness of birth control pills.

 

Please call the office if you have:

  • uncontrollable pain
  • excessive or severe bleeding

GUM THERAPY (SCALING AND ROOT PLANING)

Do not eat anything until the anesthesia wears off, as you might bite your lips, cheek, or tongue and cause damage.  You will probably have some discomfort when the anesthesia wears off; take your non-aspirin pain medication as directed, whether it is prescribed or over-the-counter.

Discomfort:

Slight swelling of the area is not unusual.

You may experience some tooth sensitivity after deep cleaning, especially to cold.  Sensitivity usually decreases within several weeks after deep cleaning and can be minimized by keeping the area as free of plaque as possible.  If the sensitivity is extreme, contact the doctor for recommendations or medications to relieve the discomfort.

Bleeding:

Minor bleeding, such as a pinkish tinge to your saliva, may occur during the first 48 hours.  You may rinse your mouth with warm salt water, but avoid extremely hot foods for  the rest of the day.  If bleeding continues, apply light pressure to the area with a moistened gauze or moistened tea bag.  Keep in place for 20-30 minutes.  If bleeding increases please call our office as soon as possible to notify the doctor and receive further instructions.

Avoid smoking 7-14 days following the deep cleaning procedures, as smoking will delay the healing of your gums.

Homecare:

Resume your homecare regimen of brushing twice a day and daily flossing immediately, but be gentle with the area recently treated. Do not be concerned if there is mild bleeding during brushing for a few days following the deep cleaning procedure.

GUM THERAPY (SCALING AND ROOT PLANING)

Do not eat anything until the anesthesia wears off, as you might bite your lips, cheek, or tongue and cause damage.  You will probably have some discomfort when the anesthesia wears off; take your non-aspirin pain medication as directed, whether it is prescribed or over-the-counter.

Discomfort:

Slight swelling of the area is not unusual.

You may experience some tooth sensitivity after deep cleaning, especially to cold.  Sensitivity usually decreases within several weeks after deep cleaning and can be minimized by keeping the area as free of plaque as possible.  If the sensitivity is extreme, contact the doctor for recommendations or medications to relieve the discomfort.

Bleeding:

Minor bleeding, such as a pinkish tinge to your saliva, may occur during the first 48 hours.  You may rinse your mouth with warm salt water, but avoid extremely hot foods for  the rest of the day.  If bleeding continues, apply light pressure to the area with a moistened gauze or moistened tea bag.  Keep in place for 20-30 minutes.  If bleeding increases please call our office as soon as possible to notify the doctor and receive further instructions.

Avoid smoking 7-14 days following the deep cleaning procedures, as smoking will delay the healing of your gums.

Homecare:

Resume your homecare regimen of brushing twice a day and daily flossing immediately, but be gentle with the area recently treated. Do not be concerned if there is mild bleeding during brushing for a few days following the deep cleaning procedure.

Following the first appointment for a crown or bridge procedure, a temporary crown is placed on the tooth or teeth involved. This will protect them while the custom restoration is being made.

Temporary cement is used so that the crown can be easily removed at your next appointment. If your temporary crown comes off between appointments, clean the inside and slip the temporary crown back on and call us for an appointment to recement the crown as soon as possible. A little Vaseline or toothpaste placed inside the temporary crown will help hold it in place until it is cemented.

Avoid chewing gum, sticky foods and candy while the temporary crown is in place. The temporary crown  will come off if these foods are eaten.

Your permanent crown will be custom shaped and shaded to match your teeth. The temporary crown is made to serve you for a short period of time, so its color and shape are not as closely matched to your teeth.

Be careful until the anesthetic wears off. Due to the strange feeling of the anesthetic, many people will chew the inside of their lips, cheeks or tongue, which can cause serious damage.

Sensitivity, especially to cold, is common following a dental restoration. The sensitivity may last several days to several months depending on how deep the cavity penetrated your tooth. The sensitivity is usually most noticeable the first 12 to 24 hours after the anesthetic wears off and then disappears slowly.

The gum tissue may have been irritated during the procedure and may be sore for a few days. The site where the anesthetic injection was given may also be sore for a few days.

Congratulations! You’ve just experienced a revolutionary tooth whitening procedure. The NEXT 48 HOURS are important in enhancing and maximizing your whitening results for a long lasting, bright and healthy smile.

For the next 48 hours, dark staining substances should be avoided, such as:

  • Red wine, Cola, Coffee and tea
  • Berries such as cherries, blueberries, strawberries
  • Tobacco products
  • Red sauces, Mustard or ketchup, Soy sauce

During the first 24 hours after whitening treatment, some patients can experience some tooth sensitivity or pain. This is normal and is usually mild, but it can be worse in susceptible individuals. Normally, tooth sensitivity following a treatment subsides within 24 hours, but in rare cases can persist for longer periods of time.

If your teeth are sensitive after whitening, a Tylenol or Advil will usually be effective in making you more comfortable until your tooth sensitivity returns to normal.

When anesthetic has been used, your lips, teeth and tongue may be numb for several hours after the appointment. Avoid chewing until numbness has completely worn off. It is easy to bite or burn your tongue or lip while numb.

 

You may take any over the counter pain reliever for tenderness or discomfort. You may take aspirin or Ibuprofen (Advil or Tylenol), unless you are allergic to these medications or have a medical condition that would prevent you from taking these medications. This will help with any soreness at the injection sites where your anesthetic was administered.

 

It is normal to experience some hot, cold and pressure sensitivity after your appointment. Hot or cold sensitivity may linger for several weeks after the placement of the fillings. Usually these symptoms will subside over time.

 

Your new fillings are fully hardened before you even leave the office; however it is wise to chew on the opposite side from the location of the newly placed filling(s) until the anesthetic has worn off.

 

One of the most common problems following filling placement with anesthesia, is an incorrect bite. If your bite feels uneven please call our office so we can get you scheduled to correct your bite.

 

If you have any further questions please contact our office as soon as possible.

Most new dentures require an adjustment period. This period will require the

patient and the dentist to work together for the best result for you and your

dentures.

 

Start slowly with a new denture. Eat easier softer foods first before attempting to

chew more challenging foods. Also, practice speaking with your new teeth. Even

if your new dentures are very similar to a previous set, there will differences that

will require you to learn to eat and speak all over again.

 

Dentures will not fit as well as they can initially. It generally takes several days

for a new set of dentures to settle into the tissue of the mouth.

 

After several days of trial wear with a new set adjustments can then be made based on your experiences. Any soreness of the gums, looseness, difficulties with chewing, or difficulties in speech can be evaluated.

.

The most important way of caring for your dentures is to brush them at least once

a day – inside and out! You can use a soft tooth brush or special denture brush.

Occasional soaking in a denture cleansing solution can also be helpful. Generally, soaking on a weekly basis followed by a thorough brushing will be adequate.

 

It is best to sleep with dentures out of the mouth. This gives the

tissues of the mouth a rest too.

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